TOEIC | Business English | The Mastery Of The Hyphen. Continued Previous   Up   Next   

The Mastery Of The Hyphen. Continued

index-error.

index-machine.

ink-bottle.

ink-pad.

judge-advocate.

jobbing-house.

jury-list.

juryman.

knife-blade.

labelling-machine.

label-machine.

labor market.

labor-saving.

labor-union.

landowner.

laundryman.

law-abiding.

law-binding.

law-court.

lawsuit.

leaf tobacco.

letter-balance.

letter-box.

letter-carrier.

letter-case.

letter-clip.

letter-file.

letter-head.

letter-paper.

letter-press (a press).

letterpress (printed).

life-insurance.

life-interest.

linen-draper.

linesman.

lisjtwork.

lockout.

locksmith.

lock-stitch.

low-pressure.

lumber-car.

lumberman.

lumber-yard.

machine-made.

machine-shop.

machine tool.

mail-box.

mail-car.

mail-carrier.

mailing-machine.

makeshift.

margin-line.

marking-ink.

master carpenter.

master printer.

measuring-tape.

metal-work.

mill-gang.

milling-machine.

money-broker.

money-lender.

money-maker.

money market.

money matter.

motorman.

mowing-machine.

mucilage-bottle.

network.

newcomer.

news-agent.

newsboy.

newspaper.

newspaper-file.

news-stand.

night-watchman.

nobody.

nonesuch.

northeast.

office-book.

office-seeker.

oil-can.

oilcloth.

old-timer.

one's self [Two words.] orange-pekoe outburst outdo outgoing outset outsider outwear overbid overcharge over-confident overpay over-produce over-production over-purchase over-scrupulous oversize overstatement overwork paper-file paper-folder.

paper-holder.

paper-knife.

paper-mill.

parcel-post.

pasteboard.

pattern-book.

pencil-sharpener.

penholder.

pennyweight.

piece-goods.

piece-work.

piece-worker.

pig iron.

pig lead.

pile-driver.

pin-money.

pocket edition.

pocket-knife.

porterhouse.

postage-stamp.

postal card.

post-card.

postman.

postmaster.

postmistress.

press-proof.

price-list.

price-tag.

printing-house.

produce-broker.

produce exchange.

produce-merchant.

profit-sharing.

proof-reader, or proofreader.

proof-sheets.

provision-merchant.

quarter-section.

quitclaim.

railroad-car.

railroad company.

railway-carriage.

railway company.

reading-matter.

ready-made.

receipt-book.

receiving-clerk.

receiving-office.

request-note.

return cargo.

return check.

return tag.

return ticket.

revenue-officer.

ribbon-stamp.

road-bed.

road-book.

rock salt.

rolling-mill.

rolling-stock.

safe-deposit.

safe-keeping.

safety-valve.

salesgirl.

saleslady.

sales letter, or sales-letter.

salesman.

sales manager.

saleswoman.

sample-card.

schoolboy.

school district.

schoolroom.

school-teacher.

scrap-book.

second-hand.

second-rate.

self-culture.

self-respect.

self-restraint.

self-righteous.

sheet-metal.

shirt-store.

shirtwaist.

shoe-sole.

shop-bill.

shop-boy.

shop-thief.

show-card.

show-case.

show-window.

sidewalk.

silk-manufacture.

silverware.

so-called.

soda-biscuit.

somebody.

somehow.

something.

sometimes.

someway (adv).

somewhere.

southeast.

spendthrift.

staircase.

standby.

stencil-plate.

stock-jobber.

stock-list.

stockman.

stock-market.

stock-ranch.

stock-room.

stock-taking.

stub pen.

subject-matter.

tableware.

tax-dodger.

tax-free.

taxicab.

terra-cotta.

thereabouts.

thereafter.

thereat.

therefor.

therefore.

thereto.

thereupon.

therewith.

three-foot.

three-ply.

three-quarter.

tie-up.

time-bargain.

time-bill.

timekeeper.

time-table.

trademark.

tradesman.

trade-union.

traffic-manager.

traffic-return.

typewritten.

typewriter.

underbid.

undercharge.

underestimate.

under-expose.

undergarment.

underhand.

underpay.

understate.

understock.

upbuild.

utility-man.

vice-president.

visiting-day.

waste-preventer.

water-mark (noun).

watermark (verb).

whereabouts.

whereas.

wherefore.

whereof.

wide-awake.

withstand.

woodwork.

working class.

working-day.

workshop.

§ 40. Division Of Words

1. In preparing copy for display advertisements, it is well to avoid division of words as far as possible. The display lines should be short enough to be taken in at a glance.

2. It is a fortunate matter that present usage permits a somewhat ragged edge at the right of a typewritten page. This allows the typist to avoid many of the problems of word-division which worry the typesetter and prove expensive when the proof-reader changes the division. But neither the typist nor the long-hand writer can avoid all the problems of word-division.

3. The general rule is, Divide at the end of a syllable. But what is a syllable?

The scholar goes by the derivation of the word, and finds a real pleasure in seeing the division geology bring out the idea of earth-science, while theo-logy brings out that of God-science. But derivation will not serve as a general principle, because it requires too much scholarship.

The commoner rule is, Divide on emphasized syllables; that is, let the stress decide what the syllable is. We can't always expect an emphatic syllable to come at the end of a line. But emphasis and pronunciation are our best helps in word-division.

4. When a word is pronounced as one syllable, do not divide it. And if possible avoid dividing words of two syllables, especially when only one letter is left or carried over.

5. Never end a line with dd or tt. Divide thus: admit-ted, red-dest. In general, divide between double consonants.

6. The following divisions are recommended by Mr. Theodore Lowe Be Vinne, one of the most careful printers we have ever had in America.

advan-tage.

appel-lant.

finan-cier.

for-tune.

foun-da-tion.

fur-ther.

gram-mar.

impor-tant.

In-dian.

mar-ket.

mil-lion.

plain-tiff.

ac-tress.

butch-er.

chil-dren.

frus-trate.

in-struct-or.

pitch-er.

busi-ness.

colo-nel.

dou-ble.

mo-bile.

noi-sy.

pa-tron.

pro-duct.

pro-gress.

trou-ble.

wo-man.

7. Some customary (American) divisions are not logical, but should be followed: fa-ther, moth-er, form-al, for-mer.

Note - I am much indebted in this chapter to De Vinne's "Correct Com-position" (composition=type-setting), Teall's "English Compound Words," Bige-low's "Handbook of Punctuation," and the style-books issued by the Norwood Press, Cambridge, Mass., and the University of Chicago Press.


  • Previous: Chapter VIII. The Mastery Of The Hyphen
  • Table of Contents
  • Next: Chapter IX. Grammatical Correctness
  • Previous   Up   Next   

    About  |   Accent  |   TOEFL®  |   TOEIC®  |   IELTS  |   GMAT  |   GRE®  |   Online Degrees  |   Buy Now  |   Partners