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Questions And Exercises: Chapter IV. The Paragraph V. The Long Sentence. Continued

§ 18. 1. Study the following advertisement in the display form and the solid form. Then divide it into three reasonable paragraphs according to the three chief stages of the campaign. Report your divisions as in the preceding exercise.

An Appropriation that Increased Thirtyfold in Three Years.

This was a hosiery manufacturer who saw his opportunity in the success of his competitors. The guarantee campaigns were in full cry. Money was being poured into publicity. We went over the situation very carefully - and saw that it needed ideas more than the mere mass of money to win out. Finally we found the right name, the right package, and the right sales plan. And he made his modest start - about one-twentieth what a single leading competitor was spending. But that first campaign established his hosiery in more stores than most of his competitors, despite their long start and big appropriations. Then we began to wage our consumer's campaign - spent enough to do it right - thirty times the first appropriation and could well afford to. For back of this campaign now was an army of merchants, with the goods to sell, with belief in the idea, and how they did push this line locally! Three years' progressive work like this has made a national success - a hosiery name that the whole country knows and trusts.

An Appropriation that Increased Thirtyfold in Three Years.

This was a hosiery manufacturer who saw his opportunity in the success of his competitors.

The guarantee campaigns were in full cry.

Money was being poured into publicity.

We went over the situation very carefully - and saw that it needed ideas more than the mere mass of money to win out.

Finally we found the right name, the right package, and the right sales plan.

And he made his modest start - about one-twentieth what a single leading competitor was spending.

But that first campaign established his hosiery in more stores than most of his competitors, despite their long start and big appropriations.

Then we began to wage our consumer's campaign - spent enough to do it right - thirty times the first appropriation and could well afford to.

For back of this campaign now was an army of merchants, with the goods to sell, with belief in the idea, and how they did push this line locally!

Three years' progressive work like this has made a national success - a hosiery name that the whole country knows and trusts.

2. Compress each of the following display advertisements into three paragraphs. Report, by numbers, what paragraphs you unite. Write out the reasons for your changes.

(a) 1. Out in Wisconsin a couple of merchants became manufacturers of men's Sweaters.

2. They had read our papers for years and naturally brought their promotion problem to us.

3. We told them to spend $1,000 a certain way with the trade and wrote the campaign ourselves.

4. Three years later, just after this firm had signed a $25,000 advertising contract with us for a national campaign, they told us that their first campaign had not cost them a cent, as it had paid for itself entirely in profits on direct orders.

5. We conducted an advance order campaign on this account which resulted in a volume of business, between January 1st and April 1st, 1910, which exceeded the entire year's sales in 1909.

6. Phenomenal results, you say - yes, and extraordinary resources that accomplish them. That's the answer!

(b) 1. You wouldn't think hosiery dye would permit very profitable advertising, would you?

2. Such a roundabout process - from the dyer to the knitter to the jobber to the merchant to the public.

3. But over in Saxony as long ago as twenty years, a great dyer saw a great light, looking toward the development of his American trade.

4. What he saw was the dominant power of the American merchant if he could be taught to demand hosiery that was dyed a pure, fast and stainless black.

5. So the campaign began the R. N. A. way, thoughtfully and carefully uniting all the interests concerned to the one great purpose of merchandise improvement.

6. It has gone on and onward to this day, until the name of this dyer is a national guarantee of dye dependability and by reason of its prestige is directly responsible for the American share of a business that dyes 10,000,000 dozen pairs of stockings annually.

3. Divide each of the following stories into four paragraphs by inserting the paragraph mark (¶). [Notice that the loop of the mark is on the left hand]. In reporting your divisions, give the first two or three words of each paragraph.

(a) A customer at a photograph supply counter bought a metal contrivance for washing prints, paying $2.50. It was delivered at his house the next day, and that evening he attempted to use it. With a piece of rubber tubing and a funnel he attached it to his kitchen faucet. But contrary to representations there was not enough force in the water to revolve the prints in the washer. They clotted together and remained at the bottom. Next day he took the thing back and asked for his money. "It's not worth the powder to blow it up!" he asserted. The clerk looked it over ruefully and called the floor-manager, who repeated the inspection. Neither could find anything wrong, but it was returned to stock and a money-back slip issued. The trouble lay in the store's neglect to train its clerks or hire men who knew their lines. The only thing needed to make the washer work perfectly was a tight connection at the faucet A screw-joint in place of the funnel would have given the water the necessary force.

(b) A man recently died, leaving to his son an estate valued at about $100,000. Not particularly familiar with investment matters, and fearful of his own judgment, the son took the money and put it into just 25 different kinds of railroad bonds - four of each. "I guess I'll be safe now," he remarked to the writer. As time went on, however, this overcautious investor found that he had laid up for himself a great store of trouble. On the various bonds he held, coupons were coming due all the time - some of them at irregular dates in the middle of the month. Not only that, but every time he opened his newspaper he saw an item of news about one or more of the roads whose bonds he held, and, being of a thorough turn of mind, felt it his duty to read all about it. The task finally grew irksome. "It's too much trouble to try to keep in touch with the affairs of so many companies," he said to himself. Finally, one of the companies went into receiver's hands and four of his bonds defaulted on their interest "Glad all my money isn't in that kind," he thought at first, but after a while the idea began to change in his mind. "Don't I multiply my risk by being the holder of so many different kinds of bonds?" he began to ask himself. "I insure the safety of the whole - that's true - but don't I unnecessarily increase the risk of losing a part? Wouldn't it be better for me to concentrate on three or four good issues, and then keep a close watch on the affairs of those companies?" Thinking ft over, he came to the conclusion that it would, and made the change. His mind has been much easier since and he has never lost a dollar of his original investment $ 19. 1. Write a short deductive paragraph. 2. On the same subject write a short inductive paragraph. §20. 1. Write two good paragraphs from the hints conveyed in the following:

A twenty page 5 1/4 x 8 booklet and cover in two colors, fifteen illustrations made and five thousand copies printed, bound and mailed - 48 hours after the copy was received.

A seventy-two page 9 x 12 catalog, cover and fly-leaf - 200 illustrations, photographed, retouched and engraved - inside printed in two colors - cover embossed - corded - twenty thousand copies printed - and we completed this enormous work in five weeks.

2. Prepare a want-ad or a telegram. Avoid complete sentences. Aim at the utmost compression.


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